Inflation in Europe: What to Know

In a market economy, prices for goods and services can change over time. Prices for some things go up; for others, they go down. If all prices go up, but the same amount of money buys you less than it used to, the purchasing power of your money has gone down. This is inflation. In other words, inflation means you can buy less with one euro today than you could yesterday.


Inflation in the Euro Area


Inflation can be good or bad. On the one hand, it can eat into people's purchasing power. On the other hand, rising prices can stimulate economic growth when the economy is weak.


The Euro Area's inflation rate has averaged around 2.1 per cent since the early 2000s, reaching a post-crisis peak of 3.3 per cent in October 2013. As of 2022, the latest projection is for inflation to average 1.7 per cent over the forecast horizon.


However, the Euro Area will still have the highest inflation rate among the world's largest economies. Inflation in the United States is expected to average 2.2 per cent, while it is projected to average 1.2 per cent in Japan.


Low inflation is usually a sign of an economy in recession. In the Euro Area, concerns have been raised that changes to the inflation rate calculation have eroded the value of low inflation. In recent years, inflation in the Euro Area has been lower than in the European Union.


How Is Inflation in the Euro Area Calculated?


Inflation is measured using the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP).


The HICP is a broad measure of inflation for the entire euro area. The HICP considers the average inflation rate in the sixteen euro area Member States and all other Member States that use the euro.


HICP is a weighted average of all prices in the country and serves as the basis of inflation calculations. The weight of each individual price is determined by the importance of the good or service in the household budget. These weights are based on household expenditure surveys. HICP is usually calculated on an annual basis.


The Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices can be calculated according to three different methodologies:


  • Market prices

  • Capitalisation of the estimated rental price (RPI)

  • Capitalisation of the estimated rental price of owner-occupied dwellings (RPI-O)


Which Factors Does HICP Consider?


The HICP covers only final goods and services. Final goods and services are those you buy yourself or pay someone else to buy. Final goods and services do not include used goods, such as buying things that have already been used. There is a separate rate for services and goods.


HICP does not include the following factors:


  • Exports and imports of the country

  • Imports from the rest of the world

  • Commodities that the country exports

  • Commodities that the country imports


The price of these items is reflected in the standard average. The HICP is based on official statistics on the cost of goods and services that are actually consumed by households.


Price changes are not considered when measuring inflation until they have been published in the official statistical bulletin. This delay allows statistics offices to make their calculations according to the same standard.


Why Is Inflation High in Europe?


Increases in the prices of goods and services can seriously affect the purchasing power of consumers. The high level of inflation in the Euro Area is a sign of the monetary union's weakness.


Three factors can explain the high level of inflation in the Euro Area:


  • The first factor is the recovery of the global economy. This means that the overall price level is rising.

  • The second factor is a shortage of goods. Let's say there is a shortage of lettuce – this will make the price of lettuce rise.

  • The third factor is the strength of the euro. The euro has strengthened in recent years. This means that the currency is worth more.


How Can Inflation in Europe Be Slowed Down?


The inflation rate in the Euro Area can be slowed down with the help of several measures:


  1. Interest rates in the monetary union are already very low. However, they could be lowered further to reduce the cost of borrowing and stimulate the economy.

  2. Euro Area countries could consider introducing a common inflation target to make the European Central Bank (ECB) more independent.

  3. The ECB could expand its purchase programme of government bonds. This would increase the amount of money in circulation and lead to inflation.

  4. The ECB could lower its deposit rate below zero. This would stimulate the economy by encouraging people to save less and spend more.

A significant source of inflation in the Euro Area is the recovery of the global economy. As a result, the monetary union's central bank can only partly control inflation levels. The ECB can use its monetary policy tools to slow down inflation. This is what the bank has been trying to do in recent years.


How Is Inflation in the Euro Area Likely to Evolve?


Inflation in the Euro Area in 2022 is expected to average 1.7 per cent. This is slightly higher than the average inflation rate in the monetary union, 1.6 per cent. Low inflation can be a sign of a weak economy. This is why the ECB has been trying to achieve the right level of inflation.


Two factors will drive inflation in the Euro Area. First, the inflation rate in the United States is expected to average 2.2 per cent. In Japan, it is expected to average 1.2 per cent. The second factor is the strength of the euro. The euro is likely to remain strong for some time to come. This could continue to pressure the monetary union's price of goods and services.


How Is Inflation in the Euro Area Affected by the Strength of the Euro?


One factor that determines inflation is the strength of the euro. If the euro is strong, this will make imports cheaper, encouraging people to buy more imports. As a result, imports rise and fuel inflation. On the other hand, if the euro is weak, this will make the price of imports more expensive, encouraging people to buy fewer imports. As a result, imports fall and slow inflation.


Low inflation balances the interest rate, which is another factor that affects inflation. When the rate is low, people can borrow at a lower cost. This encourages people to take out loans and invest. As a result, economic growth rises, and inflation goes up.


Low inflation generally encourages people to save more. This means that the amount of money circulating in the European economy will be lower, which will slow down demand. When the inflation rate is low, the interest rate will be higher. This will encourage people to save more and spend less, slowing down the economy.


Is Inflation Risky for Investors?


Inflation can be risky for investors. This is because the value of savings decreases over time if the inflation rate is higher than the interest rate. This means that your savings do not generate enough money to cover the cost of living.


Inflation is a major risk for long-term investors. This is because inflation can harm the value of their investments.


The effect of inflation on long-term investments is a knock-on effect. For example, let's say that you purchased a five-year government bond that pays interest at a fixed rate of two per cent. If the inflation rate is expected to average 2.5 per cent over the next five years, then the real interest rate will be zero per cent over the same period. This means that the actual value of your investment will be the same at the end of the five years.


The value of savings is affected by inflation. However, if inflation is lower, the value of savings will grow faster over time. The interest rate is key to understanding the effect of inflation. While inflation harms the value of a long-term investment, the interest rate determines the value of a long-term investment in real terms.


How Does Inflation Affect the Euro?


The inflation rate in the Euro Area is one factor that determines the value of the euro. If the inflation rate in the monetary union is high, then investors will expect the euro to be more valuable. As a result, demand for the currency will fall, and its value will decline over time.


The euro is affected by inflation for several reasons. Inflation makes the cost of goods and services more expensive, which reduces the purchasing power of consumers. A low level of inflation is generally regarded as a good sign for the euro. When the inflation rate is high, investors expect the euro to be weaker.


Are There Ways To Protect Yourself Against Inflation?


There are several ways to protect yourself against inflation. One of the best ways to protect against inflation is to invest in gold. This works because when the price of gold rises, the amount of money invested in it rises too. This means that the value of your investment remains the same. However, investors have other options, too.


How to Hedge Against Inflation


Buying gold and other commodities can be a way of protecting yourself against inflation. This is because inflation generally does not affect the price of gold and other commodities.


Gold and other commodities are good hedging tools against inflation. Gold, for example, is an excellent hedge against inflation. One of the factors that determine the price of gold is the level of inflation. If the inflation rate is expected to be higher than the interest rate, then the value of gold will rise.


Risk Hedging with Currency ETFs


An alternative way to hedge against inflation is to invest in currency ETFs. An ETF is a type of security that tracks the price of a designated asset. When you invest in an ETF, you become a co-owner of the underlying asset.


One example of a currency ETF is the euro ETF (NYSEARCA: FXE). This ETF tracks the price of the euro against the US dollar. For example, if the euro traded at US$1.15, then the value of the ETF would be US$1.15.


The euro ETF is a great way to hedge against the euro. However, it is a poor way to hedge against inflation. The reason for this is that the euro ETF only tracks the price of the euro against the US dollar. As a result, the ETF does not offer the same level of protection as gold. Gold is a good hedge against inflation because it is not affected by inflation.


Risk Hedging with Forward Contracts


Another way to hedge against inflation is to invest in forward contracts. One example of a forward contract is a foreign exchange forward contract. A forward contract is a contract to buy or sell an asset at a predetermined price. It protects you against an adverse change in the exchange rate between two currencies.


For example, let's say that you are an exporter in the Euro Area who sells its products to Germany. Let's also say that you agree to sell 1,000 products at US$1,000. The transaction is made in euros, which means that the value of the transaction is US$1,000.


The price of the euro rises against the US dollar. As a result, the cost of the transaction increases from US$1,000 to US$1,200. In this case, you will lose $200 if you do not hedge against the exchange rate. In this case, a forward contract is necessary to protect you against the risk of a strong euro.


Risk Hedging with Options


Another way to hedge against exchange rate risk is to invest in options. There are several options to choose from. The most common options are American options, European options and Asian options.


American options allow you to make a transaction at a later date. The disadvantage of American options is that the transaction fee is generally higher.


European options allow you to make a transaction later. The advantage of European options is that you can protect yourself against adverse changes in the underlying asset price without paying a transaction fee.


Asian options work similarly with American options in that they give you the option to make a transaction at a later date. The disadvantage of Asian options is that the transaction fee is also higher.


Inflation Risk Is a Risk to Consider


Inflation is a risk to consider when investing in the Euro Area, especially because it can harm your investment. The key to understanding inflation is the interest rate. The interest rate is a key factor because it makes the value of a long-term investment more valuable.


Conclusion


A high level of inflation can have a negative effect on the value of your investment. The key to understanding inflation is the interest rate. The interest rate is a key factor because it makes the value of a long-term investment more valuable.


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